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25Oct 2016

Tyre & Rubber Recycling October 2016 – DEVULCANIZATION

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13Oct 2016

Asian Retread Conference Kuala Lumpur October 2016

GBS  

These are the results from evaluations of SRI’s latest development in it’s Devulcanization Technology which has pushed the boundaries of what is possibly in terms of recycling scrap rubber and converting it into value added rubber compound. In this case the SRI compound with added sulphur alone can now be vulcanized again. Even more impressive are the recovered properties from the devulcanized rubber compound on its own, however the true testament to compounds performance comes from the properties generated in blends.

The surprising detail in this case is that the scrap from buffing dust after the SRI Devulcanization process yields more than 9.6MPa with and extarodinary Elongation at break of in excess of 300% on its own. The fact is these results are well within the parameters required for a number of applications as is. This changes the general perception of what can be achieved by recycling, effectively taking it to a higher level than ever possible before.

The results above totally changed the existing understanding of what can and cannot be done in terms of recycling rubber scrap. Through the SRI Devulcanization Technology with it’s latest development has completely revolutionized rubber recycling and made devulcanization the sustainable and cost effective way forward.

In the above case SRI has taken an Asian volume consumption, medium grade compound and added SRI DVR Compound (buffing feedstock) up to 30% by weight. The results speak for themselves marginal change in tensile to up to 30% loading but extraordinarily no loss in EB% at all.

Rolling Resistance and Heat Buildup are the primary cause of CO2 generation and impact on global warming from all truck and passenger car tyres from their manufacture, feedstock, logistics through to running on the roads. The accepted indicator of impact on Rolling Resistance and Heat buildup in rubber compounds is measure of Rebound Hysteresis. The challenge has always been to find materials that do not adversely impact the CO2 generated by tyres, the problem being that all rubber related recycled content have a deleterious impact on the rebound hysteresis.

The above are Rebound Hysteresis results of SRI DVR Compound in tread rubber applications measured by 2 global tyre manufacturers. They effectively confirm that SRI Devulcanization Technology produces rubber compound that does not change the Rolling Resistance properties when blended at high loading with global commercial truck and passenger car tyre compounds.

Given that only a little more than 13% of the CO2 generated by tyres is from it production and related areas, the vast majority of CO2 generated by tyres more than 86% is from the tyres on the road through to its end of life. This means that the SRI DVR Compound contributes to the sustainability of tyres in terms of 13% CO2 generated through production and based on the above results it has an even greater impact on the 86% of CO2 generated by the tyres on the road.

The SRI Devulcanization Technology, Real Sustainability, Real Solutions, Greening the Environment One Tyre at a Time.

03Jan 2014

Cost-effective solutions for recycling tires and waste rubber

SRI Elastomers is featured in the latest November – December, 2013 issue of Rubber Asia Magazine. In this article, SRI’s CEO, Gopinath Sekhar follows up on his presentation including data on SRI Compound use in retread tire compound blends at India Rubber Summit & Dinner 2013 in Cochin, India.

11Oct 2011

European Rubber Journal Report on Tire Recycling – SRI Featured

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SRI has been featured in the September / October edition of The European Rubber Journal. In this issue, David Shaw’s report asks the important question, “Why is recycled rubber not used in tyres?” The European Rubber Journal is the world’s leading publication specialising in the rubber industry in Europe.